Submit

To submit, please send a cover letter containing your bio, pronouns, and relevant social media you’d like attached, in an email addressed to sblitmag@gmail.com with the subject line [POETRY or FICTION or NONFICTION or OTHER] SUBMISSION. Please attach the work(s) you wish to be considered for publication as a .pdf, Word or Google doc, in an appropriate font such as Times New Roman, Garamond or similar in the email. Please submit poetry under three pages of length, nonfiction and fiction prose, please do not exceed 3,000 words in length. There is no minimum length. We do not consider previously published works, including personal websites, blogs, etc… If this is a simultaneous submission, please indicate so in your cover letter and if your work is accepted elsewhere, please inform us immediately.

You are welcome to submit as many pieces as you’d like, however, we may only accept one piece for publication. Writing submissions require a small reading fee of $1.00 per piece. If you are submitting photography or traditional art, you are not required to pay this fee. Upon receiving your submission, an invoice will be sent to you via email. Your work will not be considered until you have paid the reading fee. Once payment is verified, your work will then be read by both our team of readers and our editors. 

The selection process is extensive and exhaustive as well as complicated but you can expect an acceptance or rejection within 3 months time. Feel free to inquire about your submission at any time, but it may take up to three months for you to receive a final acceptance or rejection. Rejections will be accompanied with a brief suggestion for edits, as well as compliments and praises where warranted. The suggestions will not be exhaustive with edits such as grammar or spelling errors, but rather identifying critiqueable aspects of your work(s), that we feel, once fixed/addressed, will significantly improve your writing. Acceptances may require small edits and proofs that will be sent to the authors prior to publication but after the initial acceptance email.

Upon acceptance, Stentorian Bitch retains first American publication rights for our electronic magazine and upon digital publication the right return to the author. SB also retains a one-time reprint right to publish the author’s previously published digital work(s) in a physical collection at the end of the calendar year. 

Because we are an indie lit mag, we are unfortunately unable to pay our contributors at this time. While we plan to implement a payment system in the future, for now, contributors to Stentorian Bitch can expect a free physical copy of the end of the year’s collection.


Things to Consider Before Submitting Your Work

  • Please revise, edit, and proof-read your work before submitting.
  • Make sure your formatting choices are purposeful and serve to add to and enhance your writing rather than detract from it. 
  • We will outright reject homophobic, transphobic, racist, mysoginist, ableist, and/or derogatory works that attempt to attack or demean individuals or groups of people.
  • Breaking the form is fun, but if you do not understand the form, breaking it serves no purpose.
  • Thesaurus abuse is uncivil and should not be practiced in a public setting.
  • While we appreciate works that explore different points of view, we do not condone nor tolerate authors who write in “own voices” of characters, speakers, protagonists, or otherwise that do not share the identity of the character. To clarify, we do not discourage your work having a diverse cast of characters, however, if your writing is about the struggle of being a marginalized person, and you are in fact not a person from that marginalized group, the story will not be considered for publication. We feel that stories which explore a marginalized point of view should be constructed from a person who has the experience of being in that group and has experienced the reality of living with that identity. For example, a white cisgendered able-bodied male writing about the experience of being a disabled black trans woman is disingenuous, and frankly, unacceptable. 

 

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